This essay looks at the extent to which the

This essay looks at the extent to which the attempts to get the better of or incorporate terrorist act have represented a menace to civil autonomies, including treatments of how specific provinces have tackled terrorist act and how specific terrorist groups have been dealt with, and the effects this has had for civil autonomies. The specific provinces that will be discussed are the UK, the United States and Colombia, with the Al-Qaeda menace being discussed in a UK and United States context, and ELN, FARC and AUC being discussed in the Colombian context.

Civil autonomies, or the bound placed on the power of the province over the rights of the person, basically guarantee an person an independent infinite within which they are free to move how they wish, every bit long as they act within the boundaries of the Torahs of that province. There are many ‘basic’ freedoms enshrined within this definition of civil autonomy, including the freedom of address and the freedom of assembly, which allow, severally, persons to knock and to protest, as they see fit, protected by the rights to a just test, should this be necessary. When terrorist act became a political docket, a cardinal inquiry about civil autonomies was raised i.e. , are civil autonomies a non-negotiable absolute or are civil autonomies relative, which need to be invariably balanced against the demand to guarantee security for all? This duality in believing about civil autonomies, and the jobs that are posed to vouching civil autonomies in this post-9/11 universe has been posed by the debut of new Acts of the Apostless of statute law in the two states most affected by terrorist act: the Terrorism Act 2006 in the UK and the Patriot Act in the United States.

Hire a custom writer who has experience.
It's time for you to submit amazing papers!


order now

In the UK, the Terrorism Act 2006 came in to coerce in April 2006. This Act was drawn up in response to the terrorist onslaughts on Britain, in London, on 7ThursdayJuly 2005, which are supposed to hold been initiated by Al-Qaeda, and, in kernel, is meant to interrupt the preparation of terrorist recruits on British dirt. The Act is extremely controversial, due to its deductions for civil autonomies, but is considered, by the UK Government, to be a necessary response to an unprecedented degree of menace to UK citizens on place dirt. Part One of the Terrorism Act 2006 has, basically, created a whole new series of condemnable offenses, including encouragement of terrorist act, the airing of terrorist publications, the readying of terrorist Acts of the Apostless, developing for terrorist act, attending at a topographic point used for terrorist preparation, doing and possessing devices or stuffs which could be used for a terrorist onslaught, misapplying devices or stuffs which could be used for a terrorist onslaught, terrorist menaces and intruding on atomic sites. Included in the Terrorism Act 2006 is the installation for certain offenses to be dealt with as extra-territorial offenses, such as encouragement, preparation and readying, which means that for any persons who engage in these offenses outside of the UK, these persons could still be brought to test within a UK scene, were their engagement in such Acts of the Apostless come to visible radiation.

Much of the contention environing the Terrorism Act 2006 rests on the diction of the Act, which could be interpreted in different manners, harmonizing to different readings of the diction: for illustration, the encouragement of terrorist act prohibits the “publishing of a statement that is likely to be understood by some or all of the members of the populace to whom it is addressed as a direct or indirect encouragement or other incentive to them to the committee, readying or indirect encouragement of Acts of the Apostless of terrorism” . So wide is this definition that this statute law criminalises any group or single that ‘encourages’ terrorist act, even without showing that the group or single had anypurposeto promote condemnable Acts of the Apostless.

Under this wide definition, as Liberty ( 2006 ) point out, the determination of the Mayor of London to ask for the Muslim churchman, Yusuf al-Qaradawi, to talk in London, during which talk he made remarks that could be interpreted as condemnable under the commissariats of the Terrorism Act 2006, could intend that the Mayor of London himself could be charged with encouraging terrorist act under the commissariats of the Terrorism Act 2006. In legal footings, when covering with address offenses, it has ever, antecedently, been necessary to include purpose as a critical component of the offense, as address itself,per Se,is non illegal, and, as such, address should merely go condemnable when it isintendedthat condemnable offenses be committed as a direct consequence of what is being said. Therefore, as Liberty ( 2006 ) province, Part One of the Terrorism Act 2006 represents a “direct incursion on free address rights, outlawing careless talk and censoring non-violent political organisation” .

In add-on, the inclusion of broadly-based extra-territorial offenses to the statute law may negatively incur on human rights jurisprudence. The statute law as it presently stands does non offer any precise definition of terrorist act, and so, under the footings of the statute law, any resistance to non-democratic governments could be capable to criminalization ( Liberty, 2006 ) . Imagine the undermentioned scenario: a Cuban citizen, who has complained against the government in topographic point, whilst in Cuba, may happen it necessary to fly their place state on the evidences of persecution, but, if that person fled to the UK, they may be apt to prosecution under the commissariats of the Terrorism Act 2006, as motivating terrorist act in their state of beginning. That individual’s basic homo right for safety whilst a refugee would hence be compromised by the slackly defined nomenclature as related to ‘terrorism’ in the Terrorism Act 2006, and by the fact that the extra-territorial dimension of the Act would let such prosecutions.

Part Two of the Terrorism Act 2006 gives more powers to the Home Secretary to forbid groups as terrorists, and inside informations processs for confining terrorist suspects without charge ( which, at present, under the commissariats of the Terrorism Act 2006, stands at 28 yearss ) . Although the proposed 90-day detainment without charge was defeated in the House of Commons on 9ThursdayNovember 2005, had this statute law gone through, this would hold badly incurred on civil autonomies, traveling against the habeas corpus which was laid out in the Magna Carta about 800 old ages ago, with many reasoning that, even in the face of a terrorist menace, so cardinal a human right should non be denied, as its denial could ne’er be justified.

The Patriot Act ( or the Uniting and Strengthening America by Supplying Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 ) became jurisprudence in October 2001, forty five yearss after the 9/11 onslaughts, which are supposed to hold been initiated by Al-Qaeda. The chief commissariats of the Act are to increase the ability of jurisprudence enforcement bureaus to seek communications, such as electronic mail and telephone conversations, to ease the limitations on intelligence assemblage by foreign bureaus, on US dirt, and to modulate, more closely, fiscal minutess, peculiarly by those ‘foreign’ persons shacking on US dirt. The Patriot Act besides included commissariats for giving more discretion to jurisprudence enforcement and in-migration governments when confining and behaving persons suspected of terrorism-related Acts of the Apostless.

Similarly to the Terrorism Act 2006 in the UK, the Patriot Act has been widely criticised for restricting civil autonomies. Many are opposed to the mandate it gives to let ‘indefinite’ detainments, of those held in Guantanamo Bay, most publically, and to the mandate the Act gives to hunts of individual’s places and concerns without a warrant, without the proprietors being present and frequently without the proprietors knowledge. The fact that telephone, electronic mail and fiscal records can now be sought, under the footings of the statute law, without a tribunal order, is besides a badgering development, in footings of the basic right to privateness of all persons which is a basic dogma of civil autonomies. Since the sign language of the Act in 2001, many Federal Courts have later ruled that many of the commissariats of the Act are really unconstitutional. Many of the commissariats still stand, nevertheless, following the reauthorisation of a revised measure in March 2006. The statute law is still being used in a mode that is non consistent with a traditional position of civil autonomies: its indefinite detainment commissariats, for illustration, travel against basic human rights and could intend that a alien come ining the United States, claiming refuge, could be held indefinitely without test, taking to suggestions that the Patriot Act seems more like Taliban statute law than statute law from a state which prides itself on its democratic rules.

As we have seen, civil autonomies guarantee an person an independent infinite within which they are free to move how they wish, every bit long as they act within the boundaries of the Torahs of that province. There are many ‘basic’ freedoms enshrined within this definition of civil autonomy, including the freedom of address and the freedom of assembly, which allow, severally, persons to knock and to protest, as they see fit, protected by the rights to a just test, should this be necessary. The Terrorism Act 2006 in the UK and the Patriot Act in the United States have shown that there is a delicate balance to be struck between leting the development of statute law that will allow jurisprudence enforcement bureaus to supervise and to avoid terrorist onslaughts and leting traditional impressions of civil autonomies to go on in a universe in which the menace of terrorist act is existent and unsafe. Guaranting civil autonomies in this post-9/11 universe is therefore an highly delicate affair, and one that generates controversy whenever it is discussed.

One topographic point in which this quandary is really existent is the cyberspace. Terrorists use the cyberspace really dynamically, aiming protagonists, public sentiment and the enemy populace, to promote engagement and rank, through psychological warfare, fundraising, enlisting, informations excavation and coordination of planning. Calls have been made for censoring of such sites, but such censoring would necessitate all-embracing statute law which would go against privateness, curtail the free flow of information ( one of the original purposes of the cyberspace ) and would curtail freedom of look for the non-terrorist multitudes. Therefore, internet censoring is non scheduled for aiming by statute law under any Act that is presently being discussed.

This quandary, and the jobs that the post-9/11 universe poses for civil autonomies is discussed widely in Booth and Dunne’s 2002 book,Universes in Collision: Panic and the Future of Global Order, which is an emended volume of essays by authors and faculty members such as Naom Chomsky and Sissela Bok. As Chomsky points out, for illustration, if political relations begins to be ruled by fright, with policies developed as a response to this fright, the terrorist will hold won some kind of triumph, as Black Marias and heads will hold been won over. What needs to be realized, argues Chomsky, is that 9/11 and the planetary war on panic which has resulted, has altered, basically, the interaction between territoriality and transnationalism, and that, as such, whole new definitions and ways of thought will be necessary in order to understand this new dynamic and to develop schemes to cover with this new dynamic, in footings of international dealingss and globalised political relations. To hotfoot in to forming statute law and implementing this statute law so shortly after terrorist events ( i.e. , 40 five yearss after the 9/11 onslaughts, in the instance of the 2001 Patriot Act, and a few months after the London bombardments in the instance of the Terrorism Act 2006 ) is to automatically, in some sense, deny civil autonomies to persons as this rushing means that Laws are drafted loosely, without precise definition, which can take to the jobs we have seen with the Terrorist Act 2006 and the 2001 Patriot Act, that cardinal nomenclature is missed, taking to jobs from civil autonomy organisations, and to statute law being passed which is a misdemeanor of cardinal human rights.

As pointed out by Chalk in his 2000 book,Non-Military security and Global Order: The Impact of Extremism, Violence and Chaos on National and International Security, terrorist act is non the lone phenomena that is doing jobs for planetary order at this minute in history. The drug trade, privateness, environmental debasement, uncontrolled migration and the spread of diseases are all responsible, or will all be responsible, to some extent, for jobs with universe order. For illustration, the international drug trade is a monolithic job for the United States, which consumes the huge bulk of cocaine and heroine produced in Latin America, for illustration. Colombia, the world’s largest manufacturer of cocaine, is the 3rd largest receiver of United States foreign assistance, through Plan Colombia, which was set up, apparently, to get the better of the cocaine trade, but which has seen American military personnels being put on the land in Colombia in order to make conflict with leftist guerillas, from the ELC, the FARC, the AUC and with rightist paramilitary groups, which, recent studies suggest, were really set up by the current President, Alvaro Uribe as an effort to battle the guerillas but which really kill as many, if non more, civilians than the guerillas.

Colombia has many Torahs in topographic point to cover with terrorist act, including the Anti-Terrorism Amendment ( 2003 ) and the Antiterrorist Law ( 2004 ) , both of which allow the armed forces to collar people for up to 36 hours, to seek places and to descry on private communications without a legal warrant. Similarly to the unfavorable judgments labeled at the Terrorism Act 2006 and the 2001 Patriot Act, this Colombian statute law has been labeled a ‘grave reverse in footings of statute law on forced disappearance’ , with the UN stating that this statute law invades the privateness of persons to such an extent that it amounts to little more than an maltreatment of basic human rights, with the new military judicial powers go againsting international human rights pacts ( Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, 2006 ) .

Therefore, for states covering straight with terrorists on their ain dirt – such as Colombia with three known terrorist groups, the ELN, the FARC and the AUC – and which have dealt with decennaries of civil war, due to the interactions of these guerillas with civilians and with paramilitary groups, and which, on top of this, have major jobs which come from bring forthing an illegal, yet extremely sought after, consumer drug, the demand to bring forth statute law to cover with these jobs is cardinal, and even though civil autonomies are besides of import, it is necessary to acknowledge that person, law-abiding, citizens besides have the right to populate a peaceable life, non to be affected by civil war. The inquiry of civil autonomies being curtailed within a Colombian scene is therefore slightly different to discoursing how attempts to get the better of or incorporate terrorist act have represented a menace to civil autonomies in a UK or USA context: these states are usually safe and life in these states presents no day-to-day menace to the life of ordinary citizens. Rural Colombians live, on a day-to-day footing, in an ambiance of war, and so these citizens, it could be argued, have a right to safety, taking to the suggestion by many that statute law demands to be enacted which infringes on personal civil autonomies, in order to track, turn up and destruct the terrorist menace which causes a larger civil job.

This essay has looked at the extent to which the attempts to get the better of or incorporate terrorist act have represented a menace to civil autonomies, including treatments of how specific provinces have tackled terrorist act and how specific terrorist groups have been dealt with, and the effects this has had for civil autonomies, utilizing illustrations taken from the UK, the USA and Colombia.

Civil autonomies, or the bound placed on the power of the province over the rights of the person, basically guarantee an person an independent infinite within which they are free to move how they wish, every bit long as they act within the boundaries of the Torahs of that province. There are many ‘basic’ freedoms enshrined within this definition of civil autonomy, including the freedom of address and the freedom of assembly, which allow, severally, persons to knock and to protest, as they see fit, protected by the rights to a just test, should this be necessary. When terrorist act became a political docket, following the 9/11 onslaughts on the United States, a cardinal inquiry about civil autonomies was raised i.e. , are civil autonomies a non-negotiable absolute or are civil autonomies relative, which need to be invariably balanced against the demand to guarantee security for all? This duality in believing about civil autonomies, and the jobs that are posed to vouching civil autonomies in this post-9/11 universe has been posed by the debut of new Acts of the Apostless of statute law in the two states most affected by terrorist act: the Terrorism Act 2006 in the UK and the Patriot Act in the United States, and, as we have seen, by the debut of new statute law which infringes civil autonomies in a Colombian context.

The essay concludes that civil autonomies are an absolute right of all persons, which includes the right to be safe in one’s ain environment. Equally shortly as this basic civil autonomy is curtailed, it becomes the duty of the Government to what it can to guarantee that safety is resumed and that life can travel back to normal. Under this description, this ‘right to be safe in one’s ain environment’ is a subjective affair: citizens in the UK and USA are safe, every bit far as we are cognizant, as the terrorist menace, whilst existent, is non a changeless, daily, concern for the bulk of persons, despite what the authoritiess of these states would hold us believe. Legislation that unnecessarily curtails civil autonomies is non, hence, necessary, until a valid and existent menace has been proven, unambiguously, to the public of that state. At that point, one time the really existent and present danger has been outlined, so civil autonomies should be compromised, in order to guarantee the safety of the bulk, as is the instance in a Colombian scene, with the caution that the statute law that is enacted is non so loosely drafted that the statute law can be used for intents other than look intoing terrorist menaces.

Booth, K. and T. , Dunne, explosive detection systems ( 2002 ) Worlds in Collision: Panic and the Future of Global Order. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Esp. chapters 1 & A ; 21.

Caldwell, D. and R. E. Williams Jr. ( 2006 ) Seeking Security in an Insecure World. Lanham, MD: Rowman & A ; Littlefield. Chapter 13.

Chalk, P. ( 2000 ) Non-Military security and Global Order. The Impact of Extremism, Violence and Chaos on National and International Security. Basingstoke: Macmillan. Chapter 1.

Collins, A. ( 2007 ) . Contemporary Security Studies, edited by Alan Collins ( Oxford University Press, 2007 ) .

Cronin, A. K. ( 2003 ) ‘Transnational Terrorism and Security’ in Brown, M. T. , ed. , Grave New World: Security Challenges in the twenty-first Century. Washington, DC, Georgetown University Press, pp. 279-301.

Cronin, A. K. ( 2004 ) ‘Behind the Curve: Globalization and International Terrorism’ in Brown, M. E. et al. , explosive detection systems, New Global Dangers: Changing Dimensions of International Security. Cambridge, MA ; London: MIT Press, pp. 448-476.

Cronin, A. K. ( 2006 ) ‘How al-Qaeda Ends: The Decline and Demise of Terrorist Groups’ , International Security, 31 ( 1 ) , pp. 7-48.

Dunne, T. ( 2005 ) ‘Terrorism’ in White, B. et al. , explosive detection systems, Issues in World Politics, 3rd erectile dysfunction. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 257-273.

Laqueur, W. ( 1996 ) ‘Postmodern terrorism’ , Foreign Affairs, 75 ( 5 ) , pp. 24-37.

Laqueur, W. ( 2004 ) No End to War: Terrorism in the Twenty-first Century. London ; New York, NY: Continuum.

Liberty ( 2006 ) .Terrorism Act 2006.Available: hypertext transfer protocol: //www.autonomy-human-rights.org.uk/ issues/6-free-speech/terrorist actact2006/index.shtml [ 2neodymiumNovember 2007 ]

Lutz, B. and J. Lutz ( 2007 ) ‘Terrorism’ in Collins, A. , erectile dysfunction. Contemporary Security Studies. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 289-310.

Mousseau, M. ( 2004 ) ‘Market Civilization and Its Clash with Terror’ in Brown, M. E. et al. , explosive detection systems, New Global Dangers: Changing Dimensions of International Security. Cambridge, MA ; London: MIT Press, pp. 423-447.

Munkler, H. ( 2005 ) The New Wars. Cambridge: Civil order. Chapter 5.

Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights ( 2006 ) . Latin America and the Caribbean part, Quarterly Report. Available hypertext transfer protocol: //www.unhchr.ch/html/menu2/5/lac2.doc [ 2nd November 2007 ] .

Whittaker, D. J. ( 2004 ) Terrorists and Terrorism in the Contemporary World. London ; New York, NY: Routledge. Esp. chapters 1, 2, 3, 9 & A ; 10.

Whittaker, D. J. ( 2005 ) The Terrorism Reader. Abingdon ; New York, NY: Routledge. Esp. chapters 1, 2, 3, 19, 20 & A ; 21.

The constant flux of leadership in the global landscape<< >>Bullying Behavior and Peer Victimization

About the author : admin

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.